Who we are?


We’re a robotic startup located in Munich, Germany, which develops and produces perception driven logistics robots. Our robots are deployed in several warehouses and solve real customer problems. With over 80 employees we’re one of the biggest Advanced-Robotics-Teams in Europe.


Team

Frederik Brantner

CEO


Lukas Zanger

COO


Dr. Moritz Tenorth

CTO


Nikolas Engelhard

Senior Expert Computer Vision


Kai Franke

Head of Electronics


Dr. Ulrich Klank

Head of Software Development


Joachim Steven

Head of Design


Marcel Debout

Project Manager Sheet-of-Light


Marco Bassa

Development - Software


Stephan Wetzel

Mechanical Design Engineer


Mehdi Tlili

Development - Software


Christian Zillner

Management Accounting


Philipp Schmutz

Development - Electronics


Roman Mansilla

Robot Software Engineer


Florin Wahl

Public Relations


Markus Grimm

Software Development


Carsten Zumsande

Software Development


Doris Walter

Office Management


Nezar Shakerchi

Mechanical Design Engineer


Manuel Walter

Robotic Service Engineer


Dr. Guglielmo Gemignani

Robot Software Engineer


Dr. Steffen Rühl

Robotic Manipulation Specialist


Michael März

Development - Software


Isabell Obst

Project Management


Jorge Santos Simón

Robot Software Engineer


Tobias Hernes

Head of Production


Julian Wendelmuth

Remote/Service-Manager


Pirmin Blanz

Robot System & Network Engineer


Darko Dankic

assembly operator


Felix Pütz

Mechanical Design Engineer


Veronika Feucht-Bode

Human Resources


David Rattenberger

Apprentice Mechatronics


Pascal Gutsche

Documentation


Dr. Mirko Ferrati

Robot Software Engineer


Marvin Würl

Development - Electronics


Johannes Winter

Development - Electronics


Jochen Sprickerhof

Robot Software Engineer


Marcel Blistein

Robot Software Engineer


Mykyta Denisov

Robot Software Engineer


Simon Harst

Robot Software Engineer


Stefan Schindl

Robot Software Engineer


Andreas Schnurrer

Mechanical Design Engineer


Ilias Patsiaouras

Development - Electronics


Lars Lütjens

Robot Software Engineer


Mohamed Behery

Robot Software Engineer


Oliver Weiß

Mechanical Design Engineer


Raphael Vering

Mechanical Design Engineer


Moritz Münst

Robot Software Engineer


Alejandro Yunta

Development - Electronics


Christoph Ihrke

Robot Software Engineer


Johannes Rothe

Robot Software Engineer


Lukas Schüth

Development - Electronics


Julian Kohr

Design


Benjamin Sommer

Senior Sales Manager


Dominik Meinzer

Robot Software Engineer


Ivan Shalnov

Robot Software Engineer


Jutta Konter

Team Assistance


Ulrich Kaiser

Project Management


Julia Scholz

Human Resources


Ludwig Heinzl

Apprentice Mechatronics


Lara Brudermüller

Business Development


Carl Robert Rieping

Business Development


Mohamed Abdelhady

Robot Software Engineer


Simon Grasser

Purchasing & QM


Martin Haas

Head of Finance


Tilman Tunk

Business Development


Carolin Lindemann

Purchasing & QM


Michael Grupp

Robot Software Engineer


Simon Schlegel

Robot Software Engineer


Falk Schönfeld

Development - Electronics


Marek Sierotowicz

Development - Electronics


Rohail Mirza

Robot Software Engineer


Christoph Moser

Development - Electronics


Dorothea Töller

Cook


Mercedes Wetzel

Production


Stefan Niggl

Business Development


Philippo Rabast

Mechanical Design Engineer


Matthias Lerchl

Robot Software Engineer


Stephan Bischoff

Robot Software Engineer


Markus Brüchle

Production


Lukas Lang

Finance


Johannes Glasmacher

Senior Sales Manager


Harald Joos

Advisory Board


Dr. Wolfgang Jacobi

Advisory Board


Dr. Ralf D. Schnell

Advisory Board


Team

Advisory Board

Mission & Vision

„The first self-thinking and self-acting warehouse in the world - that is our vision. With our work we want to promote the development of robotics and actively shape the future of logistics.“

Frederik Brantner, CEO and Founder Magazino GmbH


The industry of the future is determined by intelligent machines and storage systems that autonomously exchange information and trigger actions. Yet this is precisely where Magazino wants to promote the development – with intelligent robots for item-specific logistics 4.0.

To develop new logistical concepts hand-in-hand with customers and industrial designers, that is Magazinos aim – designed by its own mechanical engineers, controlled by its own electrical engineering and aroused by its own software. The development goes towards autonomous mobile systems that can handle more and more complex objects. With Magazinos technology there are new possibilities to relieve employees and to make the processing steps more efficient and cost-saving.


Mission & Vision

„The first self-thinking and self-acting warehouse in the world - that is our vision. With our work we want to promote the development of robotics and actively shape the future of logistics.“

Frederik Brantner, CEO and Founder Magazino GmbH







FAQ: The idea behind Magazino

1What is Magazino doing exactly?
Magazino develops and builds perception-controlled, mobile robots for the field of internal logistics. The mobile piece picking robot TORU is the newest development by Magazino. Until now, it was only possible to automatically pick large batches of items in boxes or on pallets. With TORU it is now possible to pick a single and specific object. Magazino's technology makes it possible to identify and localize individual objects on a shelf, safely grasp them, and drop them at the desired destination. This is possible because of 2D and 3D cameras on the robots. The intelligent robotic system works in parallel with humans and delivers parts at the right time to the right workstation or shipping station. Magazino delivers the perfect product-logistic for the industry 4.0 using the TORU or SOTO robots.
2How does Magazino work?
Almost everything happens in house, from the initial conception of an idea, to the design and development of the software, all the way through the final construction of the robot. Because of this, Magazino is able to react flexibly to the individual demands of each customer. Every employee is actively involved in the creative process to help come up with innovative ideas and solve complex problems.
3What is Magazinos goal regarding their products?
We want to revolutionize the logistics market. Internal warehouse delivery demand for small batch sizes requires new solutions, and perception operated, intelligent robots are changing the world. Magazino's goal is to develop new logistic concepts with customers and industrial designers. Magazino's products are designed by our own engineers, powered by our own electronics, and brought to life by our own software. The future of logistics will be determined by intelligent machines and warehouse management systems that are capable of exchanging information and doing work by themselves. At this point, Magazino wants to push the innovation using intelligent robots developed for mobile piece picking technology.
4What is Pick-by-Robot?
As of now, there a two systems for picking objects: man-to-product and product-to-man. With man-to-product picking, the worker must physically travel to the object storage area and pick it by hand. The product-to-man system is based on the idea that a carrier (e.g. boxes or pallets) containing the desired item is brought to the worker by a handling system. Once there, the worker can remove the item from the container. In both cases, the actual picking of the object is done by a worker. This means it is a semi-automatic operation. Pick-by-robot is a fully automated alternative where the autonomous TORU drives to the relevant storage area and grasps the single desired object before delivering it to the appropriate location all by itself.
5What is item specific handling?
Until now, it was only possible to pick large batches of items using standardized boxes or pallets (product-to-man Systems). Now, with TORU it is possible to pick single objects. With the help of Magazino's technology it is possible to identify and localize single objects on a shelf, safely grasp them, and drop them at their desired destination. This is possible because of the 2D and 3D cameras on the TORU. With item specific handling, Magazino closes a central gap in the automatization of logistic processes.

Magazino Products

1What is the difference between TORU and previous logistic solutions, regarding the sector of picking object?
TORU 's high flexibility is the main difference between pick-by-robot solutions and previous automatization solutions in logistics. Automatic product-to-man systems, like automatic small component warehouses (AKL) or high bay warehouses (HRL) are typically custom built, which means they are very expensive and take a long time to develop. Modifying and upgrading these systems is usually even more expensive. With these older systems, picking a single object out of a container or off of a shelf requires the entire container to be move before a human reaches in an removes it. This whole process is time consuming and wasteful.

TORU picking robots can be implemented in an existing warehouse and work alongside humans, all while quickly adapting to new environments. This means the robots can be implemented at whatever rate is desired, which can help decrease initial investments during a transition period. In addition, TORU can grasp single objects, which means manual picking is no longer necessary.
2What are the specific advantages of TORU?
TORU is an intralogistics system with highly flexibility. TORU reduces labor cost associated with human pickers and also increases the amount of work time available. Unlike a product-to-man system, there are no high investments necessary because the robot can work together with men and can be implemented parallel with the human workforce if needed. TORU is intelligent, and is capable to of adapting to whatever layout it is placed in.

Unlike older systems, TORU has the ability to locate, grasp, and deliver single objects from their storage containers using adjustable grippers.
3Why are there different Robots from Magazino?
Depending on the shape of the products (rectangle boxes, even surfaces, irregular shapes etc.), TORU can be adapted to meet the task at hand. The TORU is built for rectangle objects and tasks in E-Commerce warehouses. The robot SOTO is built for small load carriers or larger cardboard boxes and is suitable for operations in assembly line production settings.

These two products allow the material handling systems to adapt to a diverse and ever changing set of tasks. For example, different robots can be implemented throughout a company, or in different areas of a company, to ensure that all product handling needs are met.
4Which sectors apply for TORU?
The E-Commerce sector experiences a high volume of orders for a diverse range of products. These orders are constantly fluctuating, and increased flexibility is required to meet customer demand. Flexibility is exactly what the autonomous robot TORU offers. It can be quickly and easily implemented in an existing warehouse and is capable of adapting to changes in its surroundings and tasks. SOTO can be used to support assembly line processes, such as automobile manufacturing, by delivering raw materials and components in small load carriers directly to the assembly station that needs them.
5Is SOTO able to handle small component boxes?
SOTO is a system, which can use different grippers depending on the product characteristics. The robot SOTO is built for exactly this task regarding of support assembly line processes, such as automobile manufacturing. SOTO can be used to deliver raw materials and small components in batches directly to the station that needs them.
6Can I implement the robots in my existing warehouse or line of production?
The robots of Magazino can be quickly and easily implemented in your existing warehouse management system. After creating a connection between the warehouse management system and TORU, the robot is ready to work. There are no changes necessary in terms of shelf layout or markers on the floor. TORU and SOTO work parallel with humans and is easily scaled to account for changes in demand. If the demands rise, the system can be expanded by adding new robots, or, if demand drops, robots can be sold, leased, or stored for future use.
7Are the robots better than a human?
The abilities of TORU and SOTO are similar to those of humans, however, as of now, our robots cannot grasp every product. Therefore, it may be necessary to have some human workers to retrieve objects that the robot cannot. Unlike humans, TORU does not fatigue. In general, it can work 24/7 (except time to charge the batteries), which increases the amount of productive working time available. TORU also eliminates mistakes made by human workers due to fatigue or carelessness.
8What is Sheet-of-light?
Sheet-of-light is a technique, developed by Magazino, to measure objects. A laser crosshair projects two vertical laser lines on top of each other and towards the object that is being measured. A 2D-Camera receives the reflected laser beam and measures the object based on the position of the lines. This method is made for measuring rectangular objects. It is also possible to detect curved surfaces, such as a book binding. Compared to a 3D-Camera, this methods uses less 3D data points, which means less computing power is needed to make the measurement. Therefore, this technique can be implemented on a laptop or tablet with low main memory. The Sheet-of-light technique is the primary measuring technique of our robots.
9What are the areas of operation of KADO?
The pick & place station KADO can be used to replace the man in the product-to-man system. For example, KADO is able to grasp objects that are delivered to it and sort them appropriately, instead of a worker doing it. Additionally, KADO is suited to pick products from pallets or within boxes. Magazino also delivers software solutions for implementing computer vision into existing pick & place stations.

Company

1When was Magazino founded?
Magazino PLC was founded in 2014 by Frederik Brantner, Lukas Zanger and Nikolas Engelhard. Their headquarters are in Munich. The Siemens Innovative Ventures group became a partner of Magazino in May 2015. As of now, the startup has grown to more than 70 employees and develops perception control robots for intra-logistics.
2Who are Magazinos founder?
Frederik Brantner (CEO) started his first company at the age of 16. He holds a Master’s Degree in International Management/CEMS. He has broad international experience (USA, Ecuador, South Africa). He started Magazino as a project end of 2011, incorporation 2014 and grew the robotics company to the largest team in perception driven robotics in Europe. He was selected as "Innovator under 35" in 2016.

Lukas Zanger (COO) successfully completed vocational training as a car mechatronic. After that, he worked for a year with the same company he trained with. He then began studying mechanical engineering at University Offenburg. While studying, Lukas was employed in a medium-size mechanical construction company and got his first experience in the field of construction development for special and standardized equipment. As an application engineer, Lukas was internationally active and responsible for implementing new equipment concepts at customer sites.

Nikolas Engelhard (Senior Expert Computer Vision) studied IT at University Freiburg. While interning at Daimler AG, he gained experience in the field of research and development for driver-assistance-systems and focused specifically on robotics. As an academic assistant at the professorship for autonomic, intelligent systems, he co-authored several publications about the field of 3D reconstructions of interiors. He wrote his Master thesis at TU Munich, in which he described an augmented reality application. Simultaneously, he designed the practice mode for a new lecture about visual navigation for flying robots. Nikolas was a scholar at the German sponsorship organization for the academically gifted and the German National Academic Foundation.
3How is Magazino financed?
After a first round of financing with the High-Tech Founding fund and two angel investors in May 2014, Siemens Innovative Ventures joined as an investor in June 2015. The three founders of Magazino, Frederik Brantner, Lukas Zanger, and Nikolas Engelhard are still the main shareholders of the company. Since then, the young startup has quickly grown and has been able to increase their clientele.


History

  • 1. December 2011

    Initial exchange of ideas with regards to item specific picking between Lukas Zanger and Frederik Brantner durin a creative thinking weekend
  • March 2012

    Start as project in Munich, building up the network
  • March 2013 to February 2014

    Start of Exist founders scholarship for Nikolas Engelhard, Lukas Zanger and Frederik Brantner at the TU München
  • January 2014

    Foundation of the Magazino GmbH (limited corporation)
  • February 2014

    Magazino presents Kado (Pick & Place Station) at the Logimat (fair for intralogistics)
  • March 2014 to June 2014

    Flügge funding provided by the bavarian ministery of economic affairs
  • Mai 2014

    Magazino is awarded 2nd best startup of munich (Best of Munich 2014)
  • June 2014

    Seed-Financing by High-Tech-Gründerfonds and two business angels
  • July 2014

    Winner of the Munich businessplan competition
  • September 2014

    Magazino presents Maru (disc storage) at the Expopharm
  • May 2015

    MARU is installed for the first time at a pharmacy near Freiburg.
  • May 2015

    Siemens Innovative Ventures invests in Magazino
  • September 2015

    The mobile robot TORU performs its first public demonstration in front of the Federal Chancellor, Angela Merkel.
  • October 2015

    Magazino runs its first tests at its pilot-customer.
  • March 2016

    TORU performs real-time picking in front of visitors at Logimat.
  • April 2016

    TORU Cube is permanently installed to handle books at Magazino´s pilot-customer, which is a book distributor.
  • September 2016

    Fulfillment provider FIEGE buys three TORU Cube robots to pick online ordered shoes.
  • March 2017

    The concept of the new robot SOTO for handling Small Load Carriers at assembly lines is presented the first time at the LogiMAT fair.
  • July 2017

    Successful pilot with the robot TORU at ITG.
  • August 2017

    FIEGE Logistics orders additional 30 robots from Magazino.